IHSG Insight

/IHSG Insight/

The Sniff Test – Benefits and limitations of diabetes alert dogs

By: Linda Gonder-Frederick | Medical Writer: Gabrielle Bauer |Date: Friday 22 August 2018| Categories: Impaired awareness, Diabetes alert dogs, Continuous glucose monitoring
The use of diabetes alert dogs (DADs) has been steadily gaining in popularity, and research is yielding new insights into their benefits and limitations. In this article, an expert on hypoglycaemia detection strategies provides a balanced overview of DADs and evidence-based guidance on their use.

A Blow to the Brain

By: Stephanie Amiel & Bastiaan de Galan | Medical Writer: Gabrielle Bauer |Date: Friday 27 July 2018| Categories: Impaired awareness, Neuroimaging, Hypoglycaemic Stress
Impaired awareness of hypoglycaemia (IAH) is a common, frustrating, and potentially dangerous problem for people with diabetes who use insulin. While researchers have yet to unravel the physiological underpinnings of IAH, neuroimaging studies have shed light on how the brain responds to hypoglycaemia—and how these responses may change as IAH sets in.

Tailored Targets – When to loosen the reins on glucose control

By: Kamlesh Khunti, Prof. MBChB, PhD, MD, FRCGP, DCH, DRCOG |Date: Thursday 28 June 2018| Categories: Hypoglycaemia, Glucose Control, Individualized Therapy, HbA1C
Tight glucose control improves clinical outcomes. While this evidence-based principle continues to guide diabetes management, the truth is not so simple.

Restoring Awareness, Reducing Severity: A strategic approach to mitigating the damage of hypoglycaemia

By: Stephanie Amiel, BSc, MD, FRCP |Date: Monday 30 April 2018| Categories: Severe Hypoglycaemia, Glucose-Monitoring Technology, Patient Education, Impaired Awareness
An awareness of hunger prompts people to open the refrigerator. The same process alows people to limit the damage of hypoglycaemia: a mental awareness of symptoms gives people a chance to take corrective action.

Hypoglycaemia is a Family Affair

By: Belinda Childs, APRN, BC-ADM, CDE |Date: Wednesday 28 February 2018| Categories: Hypoglycaemia, Family, Continuous Glucose Monitoring
Hypoglycaemia affects not only people with diabetes, but everyone who loves and cares for them. Having a brother with type 1 diabetes, I have seen this phenomenon up close. My brother would sometimes drive to unfamiliar places without remembering how he got there. He would awaken at night, confused and belligerent. On several occasions, a family member had to call emergency medical services to treat him. Over time, these episodes created a chronic weariness and wariness in our family, which persisted even after a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system significantly reduced his lows. Having a sister who knows quite a lot about hypoglycaemia has not fully solved his challenges with hypoglycaemia.

Severe Hypoglycaemia in Children: A Shifting Landscape

By: Tim Jones, MD, DCH, FRACP|Date: Friday 26 January 2018| Categories: Diabetes in Children, Hypoglycaemia, Type 1 Diabetes
Many clinicians perceive the risk of severe hypoglycaemia as firmly tethered to the level of glucose control: the tighter the control, the greater the risk. This perception has its roots in the historical association between A1C and hypoglycaemia risk, established in several studies. As a frequently cited example, the DCCT trial found a 3-fold increased risk of severe hypoglycaemia in patients randomized to the intensive management arm of the study.

Can Patients Rely On Their Blood Glucose Readings?

By: Bastiaan E. de Galan, MD PhD|Date: Thursday 30 November 2017| Categories: Diabetes, Hypoglycaemia, Glucose Levels|
Optimizing glucose control is critical for patients with diabetes to minimize risks of micro- and macrovascular complications associated with hyperglycaemia. To this end, individuals with diabetes who depend on insulin replacement therapy, particularly those on basal-bolus regimens, need to be aware of their blood glucose values to guide treatment decisions.

Giving Severe Hypoglycaemia the Attention it is Due

There is a line in the sand between mild and severe hypoglycaemia (SH). While mild hypoglycaemia is not trivial, it does not threaten life and health as SH does. For people who depend on insulin and other glucose-lowering drugs associated with hypoglycaemia, clinicians often consider a degree of SH “the cost of doing business” in diabetes management—in other words, an unwanted but unavoidable corollary of treatment.